This is Cool as All Get-Out!

I am notorious for saying things like that. I have also been known to throw a “neato” or even “groovy” into what would otherwise be considered a normal, adult conversation. “Yikes” and “holy smokes” are also among my favorites.

retro slang

The terms themselves are conversation pieces. I especially enjoy using cool terms like that, because members of my generation will say something like, “I haven’t heard that word in ages,” and (this is the really fun part) – members of Generation X, Y, and the millenials just look at me like I’m from another planet. For all they know, I could be speaking ig-pay atin-lay (another language they never learned!).
When I am questioned about my use of unusual adjectives and interjections, I respond simply, “It is the language of my g-g-g-g-generation. I am a virtual glossary of retro slang and comic book terminology.
Therefore, it is with great pleasure I proclaim my vindication. This morning I heard on the news about a sort of return of retro slang (see link to Huffington Post story below). I knew it was just a matter of time before society would join me in celebrating the non-profane slang expressions of our lifetime- even if you weren’t “in with the in-crowd.”  When you consider, it really is all a part of our shared cultural heritage.
Besides that, it’s just fun, and (as John Denver, one of my all-time favorite songwriters would say), “Far out!”

Reference: “11 Vintage Slang Terms That Need To Make a Comeback”

Now, for the proverbial “call to action:”
If you liked this piece, please click “Like,” leave a comment, “Follow” my blog, better yet, share the link with friends, family, or colleagues you think would enjoy it. It’s the only way a writer can gather an audience.
Thanks very much! 🌹
Nancy

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About nancsue

Writer - Former newspaper columnist - lover of all things nostalgic, collies, music, humor, snowy places, & grateful to those who defend American citizens at home and abroad.
This entry was posted in 1960s, americana, Baby Boomers, cultural history, Humor, mid-centurians and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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