“Working 9 to 5 – what a way to make a living”

After years of being a secretary, currently called an “administrative professional,” I was able to go home and be a full-time mom.  Fortunately, for many of those mom years,  I was also writing a newspaper column.  In April 1992, I penned this piece, based on my secretarial experience.  Overall, the role was not unlike the job as depicted in Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5.”  I worked for a few Mr. Harts.  You was also blessed to work with some excellent manager/mentors.

Because this is ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONALS WEEK,  I am sharing it.  Though the IBM Selectric has gone the way of dial phones and Studebakers, little else has really changed for the women who answer make the coffee, type the memos, answer the phones, and keep it all together.   

Traditionally, the Wednesday of Administrative Professionals Week was known as “Secretaries Day,” when the administrative would be treated to lunch by her superiors.  And by “superior,” I don’t mean the people who are necessarily any smarter than the administrative – they just make a lot more money.

So, here’s hoping all secretaries/administrative assistants get a free lunch, candy, flowers, or all of the above today! 



Now, for the proverbial “call to action:”

If you liked this piece, please click “Like,” leave a comment, “Follow” my blog, – better yet, share the link with friends, family, or colleagues you think would enjoy it. It’s the only way a writer can gather an audience. Thanks very much! Nancy 🌹

Advertisements
Posted in Employment, Holidays, Humor, movies, pop culture, women | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Valentines – Giving from the heart

A commentary from my past life as a newspaper columnist – published February 13, 1991 in the Garland Daily News (Garland, TX)


Now, for the proverbial “call to action:”

If you liked this piece, please click “Like,” leave a comment, “Follow” my blog, – better yet, share the link with friends, family, or colleagues you think would enjoy it. It’s the only way a writer can gather an audience. Thanks very much! Nancy 🌹

Posted in Humor, Love, Nostalgia, Valentine's Day | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Death of the American Dream 

Like a book not read,
Like a song not sung,

Like a prayer unsaid 

Or an unknown tongue,

The American Dream, one of faith and trust,

Is growing old and gathering dust.

A yellowed page in a history book,

The stagnant pool, once a flowing brook.

Do we love our country,

Or merely reside in the land of our birth

With no feeling of pride?

In a famous museum, its cobwebs are seen –

Cobwebs of liberty, which once was our dream.

But, the ideals were buried when the heroes died,

And the candle of patriotism smolders inside,

Inside all our hearts where it flickers, then dies.

When will Americans open their eyes

To see, in a graveyard, a tombstone which reads:

“The American Dream

…And it’s covered with weeds.

                       Nancy Sue Krenrich 


I wrote this poem when I was in high school, over 35 years ago. Sadly, is still relevant.

Now, for the proverbial “call to action:”

If you liked this piece, please click “Like,” leave a comment, “Follow” my blog, – better yet, share the link with friends, family, or colleagues you think would enjoy it. It’s the only way a writer can gather an audience. Thanks very much! Nancy 🌹

Posted in american history, Freedom, history, Patriotism, Poetry | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Do The Gifted Lack Honor?Or is it Suppressed by Celebrity?

As a consequence of Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte’s misremembering, misrepresentation, or outright lying about being robbed at gunpoint after an Olympic party, some companies, including Speedo and Polo Ralph Lauren, among others, have dropped their sponsorship/endorsement deals with the Olympic medalist.  Whether it was exaggeration or outright fabrication, the operative word here is “consequence.”

Apparently, the most gifted among us are not always the most honorable. One need only look around at professional sports and the entertainment industry for example after example of individuals with gifts, the magnitude of which vastly exceeds their apparent moral aptitude.

In my own simplistic logic, I find myself picturing God creating souls and bestowing on some, these amazing gifts – some born to be great athletes, musicians, actors, writers, etc. They are gifts, because the individuals did nothing to earn them. They were, quite simply, blessed by God with these remarkable talents.

I am then left to wonder. Did the parents, teachers, and/or coaches of these individuals, recognizing the talent, spoil and coddle them throughout their lives to the point where the gifted became and believed they were entitled? At some point in a lifetime of almost constant winning and subsequent indulgence, do they just come to think themselves  as above the rules, laws, and standards of behavior the rest of us must follow?

This is likely a “chicken/egg” discussion. However, we continue to see these things, ranging from such extremes as O.J. Simpson, to the non-criminal, but disappointing Tiger Woods’ “amorous indiscretions,” Lance Armstrong’s alleged “ped” use, Bill Cosby, and now this simply embarrassing situation for a celebrated Olympic swimmer. I cite those examples as more high profile and recent. Yet, stories of blatant indiscretions of the “celebrated,” over the centuries, ranging from criminal to merely disgusting, disappointing failure to demonstrate honor or any sense of morality, would fill volumes.

I am often reminded of a line from the 1984 movie Amadeus,where Antonio Salieri (played by F. Murray Abraham), was so disheartened that the crude, lustful, vulgar Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce) was born with such a magnificent musical gift, when Salieri longed for such blessing, and promised to praise God with it. Yet, despite his prayers, Salieri had only mediocre musical talent, and finally, in despair, asked, “What was God up to?”

I found that single line so funny, yet painfully poignant, and I don’t think Salieri’s resentment was that uncommon. I’m guessing many of us have thought, at some time, “If only I had that gift, talent, opportunity…I would use it for good, and give the glory to God.”

For those born with the God-given gifts, we can only offer the advice Jiminy Cricket gave Pinocchio: “Let your conscience be your guide.”

And if you don’t have a conscience, it might be a good idea to just learn something from the consequences of your poor judgment.

Now, for the proverbial “call to action:”

If you liked this piece, please click “Like,” leave a comment, “Follow” my blog, – better yet, share the link with friends, family, or colleagues you think would enjoy it. It’s the only way a writer can gather an audience. Thanks very much! Nancy 🌹

Posted in Blessings, celebrities, entertainment, Fame, famous people, movies, pop culture, Psychology, Sports, Success/Failure | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Loving Blindly, Like Katie Morosky in “The Way We Were”

Redford’s character (Hubbell) said to Streisand’s in THE WAY WE WERE: “When you love someone, from Roosevelt to me, you go deaf, dumb and blind.”
Like Streisand’s Katie Morosky, I also do that. From the Beatles to collies, I give it my all. When I was a teen, my best friend would offer this heads up to any new prospective boyfriend on my horizon: “If you really want to get in good with Nancy, don’t ever say anything bad about the Beatles or the Kennedys.”

I was reminiscing today about one of my all-time favorite jobs – when I worked in the Office of the late Dallas Mayor Jack W. Evans. Not only was he a good, honorable man, I made a couple of lifelong friendships there.  

According to civil service records, I was a “secretary.” However, I was blessed with an immediate supervisor who believed in matching abilities and talents to the job. So, when she and Mayor Jack learned I could write, my primary responsibilities were writing his speeches, the Mayoral proclamations, and responding to citizens’ correspondence. 
Continue reading

Posted in Adulthood, Dallas history, Employment, Government, movies, politics, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

It’s Time to Escape SHAWSHANK – Quit Your Job & Find a New One

Each miserable day blends into the next.  The only changes are negative.  You think it might be time to change jobs.  But, it’s rough out there.  Times are hard, and your paycheck (such as it is), keeps coming.  And then there’s that pesky health insurance you must have (or suffer the penalizing fine at tax time).  So, how do you know when the time is right to make what Steve Harvey calls “the jump?”

 • You haven’t had a vacation in three years. Vacation??? You can’t even get time off to go to the doctor.

 • You spend more on headache and stomach medication than you do on groceries.

 • You can’t sleep, and the few hours you do get are filled with nightmares of work.

 • Your only day(s) off is spent in the fetal position, dreading tomorrow.

 • You wake each morning and do a lump check, hoping for cancer.

I say JUST DO IT.  Here’s Steve Harvey’s more eloquent inspiration:

Now, for the proverbial “call to action:”

If you liked this piece, please click “Like,” leave a comment, “Follow” my blog, – better yet, share the link with friends, family, or colleagues you think would enjoy it. It’s the only way a writer can gather an audience. Thanks very much! Nancy 🌹
Continue reading

Posted in Adulthood, Aging, celebrities, Depression, Employment, mid-centurians, pop culture, Success/Failure | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Dickens and Do-Overs

I can’t help wondering if perhaps Charles Dickens’ inspiration for “A Christmas Carol” was not just looking back over his life. Was there just that moment when he wished that all he had lived through was but a dress rehearsal for the real thing? Was there not the slightest hope that it was all just a dream from which he learned what he needed to know.  He then awoke, and instead of it being Christmas Day, it was actually the first day of the rest of his life.

My first real understanding of this Dickens’ tale was the animated Mr. Magoo version. I could never forget his relief and utter jubilation upon realizing the horrors he had seen were but a dream.  The spirits had done it all in one night, and he had not missed Christmas Day.  He was given a second chance to make everything right. 

As someone having a bout of wisdom once told me, “The worst thing about life is the learning curve.”

If only life could be like Ebenezer’s bad dream, from which we could wake and begin anew. 

Now, for the proverbial “call to action:”

If you liked this piece, please click “Like,” leave a comment, “Follow” my blog, – better yet, share the link with friends, family, or colleagues you think would enjoy it. It’s the only way a writer can gather an audience. Thanks very much! Nancy 🌹
Continue reading

Posted in Adulthood, Authors, Christmas, Growing up, Literature, mid-centurians, movies, pop culture, Success/Failure | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments